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Library Instruction

Information literacy and library instruction at Alfred University.

Information Literacy

Information Literacy is the set of integrated abilities encompassing the reflective discovery of information, the understanding of how information is produced and valued, and the use of information in creating new knowledge and participating ethically in communities of learning. (Association of College & Research Libraries Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education, 2016). 

Alfred University Librarians seek to educate, equip, and center our students so that they can be careful and conscious creators and users of information in their academic, personal, and professional lives. This can take the form of library instruction sessions, individual research consultations, or asynchronous modules.

Request a Session

Alfred University Librarians offer instruction in library research and information literacy sessions for your students. 

Our sessions are generally connected to a course, and are often tailored to address the information literacy needs of the students in that particular class. However, we can offer a great variety of customized instruction sessions, from a basic library orientation to advanced research skills. 

Please contact the Information Literacy Librarian, Kevin Adams at adamska@alfred.edu with any questions, or to request a session.

Asynchronous Modules

Information Literacy Modules – The Information Literacy Librarian, Kevin Adams, has created a series of Information Literacy modules to support student learning. These modules have been created for AU faculty to easily import into their Canvas courses. If you are interested in using any of these modules in a course, just email Kevin Adams at adamska@alfred.edu

Each module has clearly stated learning outcomes. Topics currently include library concepts, finding sources, developing research questions, evaluating sources, and providing citations in MLA, Chicago, and APA.